Understanding of the Risks, Complications, and Side Effects Related to Vasectomy Reversal Procedures

Similar to Easy Vasectomy, the complications from Easy Vasectomy Reversal are rare because of minimal invasive approach, but any surgery carries some degree of risk. Vasectomy reversal is much longer and more complicated microsurgery than a vasectomy, it has a greater chance of side effects.

Most common vasectomy reversal complications include bleeding and infection following the procedure.

Anesthesia: Dr. Shu performs the vasectomy reversal under local anesthesia which avoids the risks and complications from general anesthesia. If it is performed under the intravenous sedation or general anesthesia, patients must be cleared medically prior to the surgery. Anesthesia-related complications include reaction to the anesthetic medications, breath diffculty, and cardiac problem.

Postoperative pain: The patients usually have mild or moderate pain for a few days after surgery. The pain can be managed with prescription narcotics or over-the-counter pain medications. The patients should avoid anti-inflammatory pain relievers (such as ibuprofen and aspirin) for the first 48 hours after the surgery to reduce the risk of bleeding, but Tylenol is fine to use. A small number of men experience long-term pain (more than three months) in the area of the scrotum or testicles after a reversal.

Hematoma (collection of blood): Bleeding under the skin that may cause scrotum area to look bruised, and bruise shows commonly in a few days after surgery, but pooled blood can be occasionally caused by bleeding in the surgery site inside the scrotum. The patients should report any unusual scrotal swelling and bruise to the surgeon.

Infections: Infection after vasectomy reversal is not common, and it occurs more common when there is a hematoma beneath the skin. Infection occurs in the wound or inside scrotum, can be treated with hematoma evacuation (I&D drainage) and antibiotics.

Hydrocele (Fluid Collection): Fluid can build up inside scrotum and cause swelling. This may resolve on its own, but may sometimes need to be drained with a needle. Check with a doctor if there is any unusual swelling.

Sperm granuloma: If sperms leak into the scrotum, the immune system can react to the sperm. The local tissue gradually forms an inflamed mass. It is much more common with vasectomy than vasectomy reversal. If it happens, it indicates that the vasectomy reversal is probably not successful.

Testicular atrophy: Testicular atrophy occurs when the blood supply of the testicle was injured, which results in permanent damage to that testicle. This can lead to scarring and dysfunction of testicle with diminished sperm and testosterone production. In general, the other testicle produces enough sperm and testosterone to compensate.

Low sperm count: After a vasectomy reversal, the initial sperm count might be lower than that before vasectomy. This may be caused by many factors such as scar tissue blocking the sperm in the connecting sites, or the reaction of the body’s immune system to the presence of sperm, or epididymal dysfuction.

Sexual difficulties: There is no physiological reason that a vasectomy or a vasectomy reversal should affect the patient’s sex drive, or their ability to have sex or an erection, but these procedures can occasionally cause significant psychological and emotional response in some men.

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