Is Ouabain the Key to Male Birth Control? | Minneapolis & St. Paul

A safe, oral contraceptive pill for men has yet to be made available, but recent research on ouabain, an ancient African arrow poison, may be the key to developing the ever elusive male birth control.

Led by a small team of scientists from the Institute for Therapeutics Discovery and Development at the University of Minnesota, the search for a non-hormonal male birth control pill ultimately zeroed in on the toxic substance known as ouabain. Found in two types of African plants, ouabain was traditionally used as poison on hunting arrows and is sometimes medically used to treat heart arrhythmias.

In addition to disrupting ion-transporting proteins in cardiac tissue, ouabain is known to affect a transporter subunit found only in sperm cells, an integrin called α4. Because α4 plays a major role in male fertility, research has focused on developing an ouabain-based contraceptive that would specifically bind to the α4 protein and disrupt sperm motility.

This newly created derivative compound, designed to target α4 proteins in sperm cells, has successfully interfered with the cells’ ability to swim and fertilize eggs—without any signs of toxicity when tested on rats. Moreover, the contraceptive effect should, hypothetically, also be reversible since the α4 protein is only found in mature sperm cells.

While there’s still plenty of testing left to do before this pill hits the market, current studies have been extremely promising. The University of Minnesota researchers plan to test the effectiveness of their ouabain-based compound in animal mating trials before moving on to toxicology and safety pharmacology studies. If all goes well, human clinical trials may launch within five years.

A safe, reversible male birth control pill is clearly within reach!

 

Vasectomy Procedures Predicted to Increase By 30 Percent in 2019 | Minneapolis & St. Paul

As the sixth annual World Vasectomy Day quickly approaches, it’s no surprise that more men around the world are becoming increasingly informed about vasectomy options and family planning. With vasectomy global awareness rapidly rising, it’s only a matter of time before we see a spike in procedures performed.
 
VasectomyStore.com, a New York “web-based surgical instrument and information store” that has promoted vasectomies for over two decades, recently predicted that US doctors will see a whopping 30 percent increase in vasectomy procedures in 2019. As public perceptions and knowledge of male contraception slowly change, more men and couples are expected to consider the underutilized vasectomy procedure.

“Vasectomy has experienced a popularity surge in recent years,” the company said in a statement. “It’s partly the economy but also events like World Vasectomy Day that really spotlight the value of men taking responsibility in family planning.”

World Vasectomy Day celebrates responsible men who rise up out of love for their partner, their family and our future. Please join One Stop Medical Center in supporting this movement—our clinic will offer a gift card for one free large pizza to all patients who undergo a vasectomy on November 14, 2018.

For more information on our clinic’s vasectomy services, please click here or call us at (952) 922-2151.

 

Celebrate World Vasectomy Day on Nov. 14 With One Stop Medical Center | Minneapolis & St. Paul



From Bali to Kenya to Mexico, the World Vasectomy Day (WVD) movement has rapidly spread across the globe with the crucial mission of engaging men in family planning conversations. This year’s WVD celebration, held in Kigali, Rwanda, on November 14, is set to feature the movement’s most comprehensive and innovative event lineup to date.

By teaming up with local NGOs and the Rwanda Ministry of Health, WVD aims to not only provide high-quality vasectomies to men whose families are complete, but to also promote family planning through a broad media campaign. This dynamic, exciting two-week lineup showcases everything from doctor training programs and vasectomy-focused lectures to a reproductive health fair and an all-day vasectomy-athon.

Dr. Shu and One Stop Medical Center are proud to support WVD for a sixth straight year. Our clinic will offer a gift card for one free large pizza to all patients who undergo a vasectomy on November 14, 2018. Through our collaboration efforts, we hope to make vasectomies more accessible worldwide while helping more men explore family planning options.

World Vasectomy Day celebrates responsible men who rise up out of love for their partner, their family and our future. Please join us in supporting this movement.

 

The Curious Case of Vasectomy Late Failure | Minneapolis & St. Paul

After undergoing a vasectomy procedure, patients typically aren’t declared sterile until a post-surgery semen examination comes back negative. While early failure of a vasectomy—where semen is detected in the ejaculate soon after the procedure—has been recorded and recognized as a possibility for nearly 50 years, late failure of a vasectomy wasn’t considered until years later.

Late failure of a vasectomy occurs when semen reappears in the ejaculate even after two previous negative specimens. In an eight-year span between 1984 and 1992, six spontaneous late failure cases were recorded. All six cases resulted in DNA-proven fatherhood despite previously consistent negative semen analyses that confirmed patients could forego secondary contraception.

In one case, a patient who underwent a vasectomy in March ’84 recorded one positive semen analysis before recording two consecutive negative analyses later that year. Despite his negative semen results, he conceived a child in November ’85 while still showing a negative sperm count post-conception.

How does late failure of a vasectomy even happen? Based on study results from Churchill Hospital in the UK, it’s assumed that patients must have intermittently produced small amounts of viable semen either in between semen analyses or after the final analysis. Furthermore, results showed that even when post-conception semen analyses came back negative, paternity was still possible and, in these cases, actually confirmed via DNA.

All in all, a vasectomy is still the most reliable method of permanent male contraception. However, it’s important for all patients to note that late failure and/or pregnancy after a vasectomy, while rare, is still a possibility.

 

Study Finds Limited Use of Post-Vasectomy Secondary Contraception | Minneapolis & St. Paul

Last month, we published a post emphasizing the importance of using contraception even after a vasectomy, as patients are NOT completely sterile immediately following the procedure. Because “a series of follow-up tests is required to first confirm that sperm are no longer present in the patient’s semen,” using some form of birth control in the first few months post-surgery is strongly advised.

However, a study conducted within the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) found that over half of the study’s couples (57.8%) did NOT use secondary contraception after undergoing a vasectomy postpartum. All couples had recently given birth and had reported a partner vasectomy four months following the live birth. Conducted in 15 states and New York City, the study assessed both the election of post-vasectomy birth control and the method of birth control used.

Essentially, this means that the 57.8% of couples who chose not to use secondary contraception relied solely on the vasectomy itself as their birth control method. Of the remaining 42.4% who opted for secondary contraception, 50% used condoms, 26.5% used oral contraceptive pills, and 9.5% chose the withdrawal method.

Based on these results, it seems that doctors and clinics need to better communicate to patients the necessity of secondary contraception in the months immediately following a vasectomy. In order to reduce the chance of unintended pregnancy, it is also important to understand the complexities surrounding why some couples choose not to use secondary contraception, despite being advised to.

For more info on our vasectomy procedures, please refer to our FAQ page or schedule an Easy VasectomyⓇ consultation.

 

A Brief History of the Eugenics Movement in America | Minneapolis & St. Paul

If you haven’t heard of eugenics (meaning “well-born”), it is the study of or belief in societal and scientific intervention to bring about the “fittest” population through means such as forced sterilization, abortions, euthanasia and discriminatory marriage laws. The movement’s intent was to improve the quality of the human population by discouraging reproduction by people with genetic defects or what were thought to be inheritable undesired traits.

The origin of eugenics in the United States began in 1899 with Albert Ochsner, future Professor of Surgery at the University of Illinois. In his published paper Surgical Treatment of Habitual Criminals, Ochsner described a new procedure that sterilized a male subject by cutting his vas deferens, a procedure that became known as a vasectomy. He advocated for the use of vasectomies on criminals, believing that:

  • It would dispense with hereditary criminals from the father’s side
  • Aside from being sterile, the criminal would be unchanged (unlike after castration)
  • It would protect the community at large without harming the criminal
  • The height of the eugenics movement (1920s to mid-20th century) saw compulsory sterilization programs established in over 30 states, resulting in over 60,000 sterilizations of often healthy people. Criminals and prison inmates were especially targeted, as well as those deemed “feeble-minded,” mentally deficient, or simply capable of passing on undesirable genes.

    Planned Parenthood, a global reproductive health care provider, was actually a product of the eugenics movement. Its founder, Margaret Sanger, was a prominent eugenicist who argued that this “new weapon of civilization and freedom” could solve “race problems” and result in “racial regeneration.” This belief in ensuring “racial purity” typically involved laws that aimed to prevent interracial marriage, taking the concept of eugenics and population control another step further.

    If any of this sounds familiar, history’s most infamous admirer of America’s eugenics policies was Adolf Hitler, who modeled the Third Reich after American eugenic institutions. As he expressed in Mein Kampf, Hitler was determined to prevent “defective people” from “propagating equally defective offspring,” a mission that he firmly believed required a systematic execution. In response, the American Eugenics Society issued a statement of praise in 1937 to the Nazi scientists who hoped to cleanse the gene pool.

     

    Here’s Why Using Birth Control After a Vasectomy Is Crucial | Minnesota

    Being told to use contraception after undergoing a (hopefully successful) vasectomy may seem counterintuitive, but the patient is NOT completely sterile immediately following the procedure. A series of follow-up tests is required to first confirm that sperm are no longer present in the patient’s semen, a process that can take many weeks. There is also the chance that the vasectomy procedure failed. In either case, patients must err on the side of caution and use birth control during intercourse in the first three months following a vasectomy.
     

    How a Vasectomy Affects Sperm Travel

    Before joining the semen, sperm must first make their way through several tubes, including the two vas deferens. Both vas deferens—one attached to each testicle—are cut during a vasectomy procedure, preventing new sperm made in the testicles from traveling through the vas deferens and being ejaculated.

    Despite the vas deferens being severed, leftover sperm may still remain in the upper part of the vas deferens near the penis. It may take anywhere from 15 to 30 ejaculations before all the leftover sperm are cleared from the tubes, and it’s not uncommon for patients to wait at least three months before becoming completely or nearly sterile. Therefore, it’s important to use birth control during intercourse until your doctor confirms that you are, indeed, free of motile sperm.
     

    What to Expect From Follow-Up Testing

    Your doctor will test your semen approximately 12 weeks after your vasectomy to examine for presence of motile sperm. If test results show that your semen is sperm-free, then the vasectomy was successful, and additional birth control will no longer be necessary. Some patients’ semen may show a small number of non-motile sperm, whereby the risk of pregnancy is very low, and additional birth control may not be needed.

    If follow-up testing shows that sperm are still present in your semen, your doctor will talk to you about your options. This may include further testing, in which case you will need to use some form of contraception during intercourse until you receive the green light that you’re sperm-free. Your doctor may also decide that the chance of pregnancy is low enough that birth control is no longer necessary.
     

    Yes, A Vasectomy Can Fail

    While the failure rate of vasectomies is extremely low, there is still a chance that the procedure fails to make you sterile. A vasectomy failure essentially means that sperm continue to be present in the semen after a notable amount of time has passed following the procedure. This can be due to sperm that existed pre-surgery, or the severed ends of the vas deferens rejoined to form a complete tube (recanalization) and resulted in an increased count of motile sperm.

    If a vasectomy fails, patients can either undergo another vasectomy or continue using a different form of contraception.

     

    No Scapel Vasectomy Versus Other Birth Control Options | Minnesota

    spermAll birth control methods work the best if used correctly and every time you have sex. Your choice of birth-control method is a personal one and depends on a number of variables, including short or long-term family planning, personal health, associated risks, failure rate and cost.

    The vasectomy is one of the lowest failure rates among the birth control methods. The study showed the traditional vasectomy failure rate is 1-3 per 1000 cases; the failure rate would be less than 1 per 20000 in no scalpel vasectomy with the fascia clipping technique.

    Dr. Shu uses 3 steps to insure complete occlusion: he cuts the vas deferens and destroys the lining of the tube on upper end with cautery (scarring it) and places small titanium clips (or sutures) in the vas fascia to separate the opened ends of vas deferens. The lower end keeps open without cauterization (open-ended technique). The vas deferens are then placed back into the scrotum in its normal anatomic position.

    Birth Control Methods Comparison

    Contraception Cost Failure Rate Duration Availability Advantages Disadvantages
    Condom <10 18% one time OTC prevent STIs; no hormonal side effects local reaction & breakage
    Vasectomy $700 – $2000 0.2% Permanent Office procedure No effect on hormones and sex drive No protection in the first 3 months, Surgical side effects
    Female Condom $2-$4 21% one time OTC prevent STIs; use during menstruation local reaction & breakage
    Spermicide $5-$10 28% one time OTC Lubricate, use with other BCP forms local reaction
    Sponge $3-$5 24% Up to 24h OTC Lasts 24 hours Local effects and infections
    Diaphragm $50-$300 5-20% Reusable Prescription Lasts 24 hours, reusable Insert challenging,local reaction
    Cervical cap $50-$75 14-30% 48-72 hours, reusable Prescription Protect 48-72 hours Abnormal Pap smear, local reaction & infection
    Birth Control Pill $15-$50/month 9% A month Prescription Regulate menstruation; reduce cramps and ovarian cysts Take daily, weight changes, and medical /risks/side effects*
    Vaginal ring $15-80/month 9% Wear monthly Prescription Regulate menstruation; reduce cramps and ovarian cysts Weight changes and medical risks/side effects*
    Contraceptive Patch $15-80/month 9% A month, replace weekly Prescription Regulate menstruation; reduce cramps and ovarian cysts Weight changes and medical risks/side effects*
    Birth Control shot $35-75/injection 6% 3 months doctor’s visit 4 shots/year; reduces menstrual cramps and the risk of ovarian cysts/cancer and PID Take up to 8 months to return; medical risks/side effects*
    Intrauterine device (IUD) $500-$1000 1% 5-12 years Doctor’s visit immediately effective Migrates, ovarian cysts, PID, and ectopic pregnancy
    Hormone Implants $400-$800 1% 3 yearse Doctor’s visit reduce menstrual flow, cramping, and PID office procedure, local reaction, Medical side effects**
    Tubal Ligation $1500-$6000 1% Permanent Outpatient surgery Permanent and immediate; does not impact sex drive More invasive, complicated than vasectomy, surgical side effect
    Essure $1500-6000 1% Permanent Outpatient surgery Less invasive than tubal ligation 3 months to take effect; side effects:cramping,irregular menstrual cycle, GI reaction, and infection

    * Medical risks and side effects: may increase risk of blood clots, stroke, breast cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, depression and anxiety; may decrease sex drive; other side effects include weight gain, breast lumps, and hair loss or excessive growth.

    **Medical risks and side effects: can cause loss of bone density and sex drive, and mood swings, weight gain, breast and abdominal pain, and allergic reaction.

    References: Birth Control Guide. Food and Drug Administration Office of Women’s Health.

    Why don’t More Men in the World Get Vasectomies? | Minnesota

    Vasectomies have the potential to be a powerful tool to curb population. By nature, they serve as a more effective, long-term solution than other methods of contraception. The procedure is a one time ordeal, as opposed using a condom or birth control pill, and avoids the negative side effects of hormonal birth control for women while have very few side effects itself. This could be especially effective in areas with low resources that have poor access to other contraceptives. However, despite being the most effective form of male contraception, only 2.4% of men use vasectomy worldwide. Why are vasectomies so unpopular? And how can we change that?

    For one, many people are simply uninformed about vasectomy as a birth control method. Studies of vasectomy awareness in Ethiopian, Nigerian, and Turkish men and women range from a lowest of 15.6% to highest of 39.6%. This extends to doctors as well- many care providers in low resource areas are not well informed about vasectomy, and do not provide the service. This lack of awareness is a major barrier to making vasectomy a more popular form of birth control.

    Another reason is negative attitudes toward vasectomy. Surveys showed that some participants felt that a vasectomy results in a loss of masculinity, or that they would be judged by others if they found out about the procedure. In India, men felt that a vasectomy would make them subservient to their wife, and that female sterilization is preferred because men contribute more economically (note that tubal ligation is far more invasive, costly, and dangerous that a vasectomy). These attitudes ultimately stem from deeply ingrained sexism. Getting rid of these erroneous notions would go a long way in making vasectomy more prevalent. In Africa, 0.1% of men have undergone vasectomies. Myths and misconceptions stop African men from going for a vasectomy, and vasectomy is often associated with de-masculinisation, framing it in terms of castration.

    One of the most effective ways of both increasing awareness and correcting negative attitudes toward vasectomy is through education, both within the community and through mass communications. Programs such as the ACQUIRE Project’s “Get a Permanent Smile” campaign sought to address myths regarding vasectomies in low resource areas in Bangladesh and Ghana through posters, radio and television broadcasts. These types of campaigns are quite effective, and have been shown to cause spikes in demands for vasectomies.

    Employer based promotion is another method of making vasectomies more popular. Once again education is key here. In one Indian study, employees from several workplaces were allowed to attend educational workshops on long acting birth control methods. Companies also trained health coordinators, provided health service desks, and providing a family planning hotline. Participants were reportedly more likely to discuss family planning, as well as make the switch from short-term contraceptives to long term ones. Incentivising employers to provide such services to their employees would encourage more men to get a vasectomy.

    Vasectomies have been sorely underutilized as a form of contraception. It may be a long road ahead before worldwide adoption of vasectomy as a birth control method is reached, but as information becomes more widely available, more men will opt for vasectomies.

    Birth Control Comparison Chart | Minnesota

    All birth control methods work the best if used correctly and every time you have sex. Your choice of birth-control method is a personal one and depends on a number of variables, including short or long-term family planning, personal health, associated risks, failure rate and cost.

    The vasectomy is one of the lowest failure rates among the birth control methods. The study showed the traditional vasectomy failure rate is 1-3 per 1000 cases; the failure rate would be less than 1 per 20000 in no scalpel vasectomy with the fascia clipping technique.

    Birth Control Methods Comparison

    Contraception Cost Failure Rate Duration Availability Advantages Disadvantages
    Condom <10 18% one time OTC prevent STIs; no hormonal side effects local reaction & breakage
    Vasectomy $700 – $2000 0.2% Permanent Office procedure No effect on hormones and sex drive No protection in the first 3 months, Surgical side effects
    Female Condom $2-$4 21% one time OTC prevent STIs; use during menstruation local reaction & breakage
    Spermicide $5-$10 28% one time OTC Lubricate, use with other BCP forms local reaction
    Sponge $3-$5 24% Up to 24h OTC Lasts 24 hours Local effects and infections
    Diaphragm $50-$300 5-20% Reusable Prescription Lasts 24 hours, reusable Insert challenging,local reaction
    Cervical cap $50-$75 14-30% 48-72 hours, reusable Prescription Protect 48-72 hours Abnormal Pap smear, local reaction & infection
    Birth Control Pill $15-$50/month 9% A month Prescription Regulate menstruation; reduce cramps and ovarian cysts Take daily, weight changes, and medical /risks/side effects*
    Vaginal ring $15-80/month 9% Wear monthly Prescription Regulate menstruation; reduce cramps and ovarian cysts Weight changes and medical risks/side effects*
    Contraceptive Patch $15-80/month 9% A month, replace weekly Prescription Regulate menstruation; reduce cramps and ovarian cysts Weight changes and medical risks/side effects*
    Birth Control shot $35-75/injection 6% 3 months doctor’s visit 4 shots/year; reduces menstrual cramps and the risk of ovarian cysts/cancer and PID Take up to 8 months to return; medical risks/side effects*
    Intrauterine device (IUD) $500-$1000 1% 5-12 years Doctor’s visit immediately effective Migrates, ovarian cysts, PID, and ectopic pregnancy
    Hormone Implants $400-$800 1% 3 yearse Doctor’s visit reduce menstrual flow, cramping, and PID office procedure, local reaction, Medical side effects**
    Tubal Ligation $1500-$6000 1% Permanent Outpatient surgery Permanent and immediate; does not impact sex drive More invasive, complicated than vasectomy, surgical side effect
    Essure $1500-6000 1% Permanent Outpatient surgery Less invasive than tubal ligation 3 months to take effect; side effects:cramping,irregular menstrual cycle, GI reaction, and infection

    * Medical risks and side effects: may increase risk of blood clots, stroke, breast cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, depression and anxiety; may decrease sex drive; other side effects include weight gain, breast lumps, and hair loss or excessive growth.

    **Medical risks and side effects: can cause loss of bone density and sex drive, and mood swings, weight gain, breast and abdominal pain, and allergic reaction.

    References: Birth Control Guide. Food and Drug Administration Office of Women’s Health.

    Possible Vasectomy Alternative in the Future? | Minneapolis & St Paul

    Many men in Minnesota wonder if any vasectomy alternatives are available in the future. Yes, a simpler, reversible vasectomy alternative is in the works at the Parsemus Foundation in California. This works by injecting a gel into the vas deferens, blocking it and preventing sperm from entering the ejeculate. The difference is that another dissolving gel can be injected that restores fertility by removing the original gel barrier.

    The technology was tested on rhesus macaques monkeys who were allowed to mate for two years after the gel was injected, and in the that time no monkeys were birthed. In the words of Dr. Colagross-Schouten: “We were impressed that this alternative worked in every single monkey, even though this was our first time trying it.”

    Gel functions like a reversible vasectomy, blocking or filtering out sperm. It is made from a dense web of molecules that form a viscous barrier in the vas deferens. The resulting gel implant remains in a soft gel-like state that allows water-soluble molecules to pass but not larger structures such as spermatozoa. This quality is thought to be a benefit for preventing back-pressure on sperm storage areas, which helps to reduce “blow out” in the epididymis.

    The whole process of procedure will be almost same as the no scalpel vasectomy. A small amount of local anesthesia is placed into the scrotal skin and around the vas deferens. A tiny puncture is made with a pointy hemostat in the numbed area of scrotal skin. The vas deferens are then secured and pulled out with a ring clamp through the small opening. The surrounding fascia is stripped with a sharp instrument to expose the vas deferens, and the gel was injected in the lumen of vas deferens. The complications of post bleeding and hematoma are expected to be lower.

    Since tests in monkeys were successful, human trials will begin shortly. Pretty soon, this alternative vasectomy method may be available across the globe which come with the benefits of vasectomy, but are easily reversible.

    Hematospermia After Vasectomy | Minnesota

    An anxious patient recently called my office two weeks after his vasectomy. “I think I might have problem with my recent vasectomy,” he said anxiously. “My wife and I had sex last night, and she noticed that there was blood in my semen.”

    Blood in the ejaculate often causes great concern to the men who experience it after vasectomy, a condition called hematospermia, or hemospermia. It could occasionally happen in the first month after a vasectomy. If you can imagine, the vas tube has been opened and any resultant blood from the wound or ruptured capillary vessels can pass through the tube during healing.

    Post vasectomy hematospermia is an uncommon finding after a vasectomy however it is not alarming Most cases of hematospermia after vasectomy are generally self-limited, and it usually resolve within a few weeks, and no further diagnostic workup is needed; however, in some patients, hematospermia may be the first indicator of other urologic diseases such as prostate or seminal vesicle (male sex glands). If it persists perhaps it might be wise to consult with an urologist

    Vasectomy and prostate cancer- Is there a link? | Minneapolis & St Paul

    Vasectomy is one of the most common methods of male contraception in Minnesota, and is popular due to its efficacy and permanence. It was estimated that 15%, or about 50 million men had vasectomy procedures done in the United States. The first mention of an association between vasectomy and prostate cancer were in the late 1980s, where a study showed a positive link between vasectomy and risk in developing prostate cancer. Further studies throughout the years since then have been contradictory or inconclusive as to whether or not vasectomies actually increase the risk of prostate cancer.

    For the most part, prostate cancer is nothing to fear for men considering a vasectomy. A recent 2015 meta-analysis of 9 different cohort studies was statistically analyzed in order to determine if a possible correlation between vasectomies and prostate cancer. The study concluded that there was no evidence that vasectomy increased the risk of prostate cancer. While there was slight positive correlation, it was deemed not statistically significant. Furthermore, correlation does not equate causation- there is no reason why vasectomy would actually cause prostate cancer. There is no proven biological mechanism that relates these two together.

    There are many reasons why early studies may have shown a correlation between the two; for an example, men who have had a vasectomy were more likely to have tests for prostate cancer under a urologist. Also, prostate cancer diagnoses in general have risen in recent decades in part due to an aging population and better testing methods. Most authorities, like the National Cancer institute and the American Urological Association, agree that vasectomy does not increase the risk of developing prostate cancer.

    Regardless, the decision to get a vasectomy is not one to be made lightly. It is an important family planning decision and permanent as well- vasectomy reversals are becoming more and more easily attainable but they are still expensive compared to a vasectomy and are not guaranteed to work, especially if the vasectomy was done a long time ago. Please take the time to decide whether a vasectomy something that you really want.

    Post Vasectomy Pain Syndrome (PVPS) | Minneapolis & St Paul

    Some men in Minnesota experience chronic pain after a vasectomy, known as post-vasectomy pain syndrome (PVPS). While pain is normal for a few days post-vasectomy, those with PVPS will continue to have pain months after the procedure. The pain can be severe enough to interfere with daily life. It can be a dull, general pain, or be sharp and localized, and many report that the pain gets worse during intercourse. In the past, the incidence of PVPS was thought to be very low (<1%), but recent surveys have shown that up to 15% of men who get a vasectomy experience PVPS, while 2% experience chronic pain that significant effects quality of life. Dr.Shu performed about 1000 vasectomies, only one patient came to have a follow up due to ongoing post vasectomy pain after three months of vasectomy.

    Treatment and cause of PVPS may be different patient-to-patient, as everyone responds differently to the procedure.There are multiple potential causes of post-vasectomy pain syndrome, including sperm granulomas (small clusters of sperm cells), neuroma (pinched nerve) due to inflammation, vasectomy being too close to the epididymis and epididymal congestion.

    Generally, PVPS is treated initially treated conservatively, via heat/cold therapy, scrotal support, NSAIDs, etc. If this isn’t enough, other drug therapies are sued. If pain is debilitating and continues despite treatment, it may require the excision of a granuloma, epididymectomy (removal of epididymis), or vasectomy reversal. These methods, while more invasive, have a fairly high rate of resolution.

    While PVPS is certainly something to take into account when deciding on whether or not to get a vasectomy, it is not common and in most cases very mild. For most, the freedom granted by a vasectomy far outweighs the (very low) potential of complications.

    Scalpel vs. No-Scalpel vasectomy | Minnesota

    Vasectomy is a surgical procedure that involves severing or tying the vas deferens, the tubes that carry sperm from the testicles. This is a very effective, permanent form of birth control.
    During a conventional vasectomy, the doctor must first make two big incisions in both sides of the scrotal skin. The vas is surgically separated from the other structures in the spermatic cord. The vas is then tied off cut, and separated. The incision is then sutured back together.

    In no-scalpel vasectomy, there is no big incision; instead, a small single hole is made in the skin of middle scrotum using a special sharp hemostat, and the vas deferens are lifted using a ring clamp. The surrounding fascia is removed to expose the vas. The vas deferens is cut, and the upper ends are cauterized. The titanium clips are placed on to keep the opened ends of the vas deferens out of alignment. The vas deferens are then placed back into the scrotum. A scrotal support is applied and the procedure is done; no sutures are used on the hole.

    No-scalpel vasectomy offers several advantages. No-scalpel vasectomy is inherently less invasive, and safer. The chances of complications with conventional vasectomy is 5-10% as a result of bleeding, scarring, infection, etc, while chance of complications with no-scalpel is less than 1%. No-scalpel vasectomy is takes 10 minutes; conventional vasectomy takes 30 minutes. No-scalpel causes less pain, and it also takes less time to heal completely. Most can resume normal physical activity the next day. They are both equal in effectiveness. Ultimately, it seems clear the no-scalpel vasectomy is the better option of the two.

    Dr. Steven Shu in the procedure clinic has performed more than 1000 non-scalpel vasectomies with 100% success rate, Zero percent wound infection, and the extremely high patient satisfaction.

    Three Common Questions Men Have About Vasectomies | Minnesota

    How effective is it?
    A vasectomy is 99.85% effective as a birth control method. Typically, a year after vasectomy, only two women out of 1000 become pregnant. So far, Dr. Shu’s techniques have proved to be very effective, and he performed about 1000 vasectomies without any failure (100% effective).
    Post-vasectomy pregnancy usually occurs soon after the procedure due to residual sperm in the vas deferens and late occurance due to vas recanalization. It usually requires 20-25 ejaculations before no sperm is present in seminal fluid; prior to that partners should take caution during intercourse, and it is strongly recommended to have a follow up test for sperm in ejaculate after the procedure.

    Tubal ligation, or “getting your tubes tied” is often seen as the female equivalent, and is similarly effective; however, it is considerably more invasive and poses higher risk of complications.

    Does it effect sexual pleasure/performance?
    Physically, vasectomies have no effect on sexual performance or libido. Vasectomies only involve cutting the vas deferens, the path that leads from the testes to the urethra. Sperm is still produced in the testes after a vasectomy, but it is absorbed into the body rather than enter the urethra. Erection, orgasm, and ejaculation all function as normal, just in the absence of sperm in the ejaculate. The testes function normally and continue to secrete hormones as they did before the surgery. Psychologically, some men may feel sexual anxiety, as fertility is seen by some as a crucial aspect of masculinity, in which case understanding and reassurance is required. That said, most partners seem to find that a vasectomy makes their sex lives better as fear of pregnancy is no longer an issue. Studies show that couples where the men has had a vasectomy tend to have sex 5.9 times per month on average, compared to 4.9 times a month for the average couple.

    Is vasectomy reversible?
    Yes! Vasovasostomy is a procedure where the severed vas deferens is reconnected to allow the passage of sperm. It is a minimally invasive procedure that can be done under local anesthesia in the office. Dr. Shu uses the no scalpel technique with minimal trauma, so the patients usually have a quick recovery. A vasoepididymostomy, done when vasovasostomy is not possible, involves connecting the vas tube to the epididymis, which is a far more invasive and is beyond the scope of an office procedure. Generally, success depends on how long the man has had a vasectomy.

    Men’s Birth Control | Minnesota

    Currently, there are very few methods of birth control available to men, as that responsibility has largely been assigned to the woman until recently. Today, however, due to rapid cultural shifts through the past few decades, there is a great and increasing number of men around the world looking to take birth control into their own hands! Still, there are few male contraceptives available to couples that engage in intercourse, which are male condoms, which are used by (15.3%) of contraceptive users, withdrawal (4.8%), and vasectomy (8.2%). The remaining 71.7% of users are using exclusively female-oriented birth control methods, such as the pill, IUD, diaphragm, spermicide, etc. Hormone-based birth control for men, like a pill or an implantable contraceptive, has the potential to be widely used but is not yet available for use.

    So, of the three listed, how do they compare?
    The most popular by far are male condoms– understandably so, as they are single serve, reliable, and do not require commitment. They offer some protection against STDs. They also don’t affect hormones, since it is a physical rather than physiological form of contraceptive, which is a relief for women that do not want the side effects of birth control. That said, condoms must be used every time a couple has intercourse to be fully effective, which can be annoying. The process of putting the condom on can often kill the mood, and many feel that having a condom on makes intercourse less pleasurable. Also, if used incorrectly, they can break, compromising their effectiveness. Whether or not condoms are worth the hassle is quite subjective, as every couple is different and may not have the same sexual requirements as others.

    Withdrawal, also known as the pull-out method or coitus interruptus is the least common of the three. The advantages to withdrawal are easy to see- it is free, there are no side effects, and it’s obviously better than nothing. However, the effectiveness of withdrawal is questionable. At it’s best it can be 96% effective, but at its worst there is a 27% chance of pregnancy. It really all depends on the male partner’s ability to pull out in time, so a high level of trust between sexual partners is required. Even if male partner is reliable however, it is possible for pre-ejaculate to contain sperm left in the urethra that can still cause pregnancy. For some it could also make intercourse less enjoyable due to nervousness and sexual interruption. It also does not protect against STDs.

    This leaves vasectomy. Vasectomy is a surgical procedure that involves blocking the tubes that carry sperm, effectively resulting in sterilization. There is still ejaculate, just no sperm in it. This makes vasectomies the most reliable form of contraception of the three. It is a one-time procedure that lasts indefinitely, as opposed to most other forms of contraception that require routine usage or usage during intercourse. It also does not affect hormones, unlike female birth control. One of the biggest concerns of getting a vasectomy is fear of it affecting the quality of sex, but it does not affect libido or sexual pleasure for either partner. Likewise, it is not a cure a lack of sex drive or erectile dysfunction. Some couples may want kids in the future, and conception is not possible after a vasectomy. A vasectomy can be reversed but requires another, more costly surgical procedure. Vasectomies also do not protect against STDs- only pregnancy.

    Ultimately, the best option depends on the needs of the patient. Deciding to get a vasectomy is a commitment and should definitely be given some prior thought.

    289 Vasectomies were Performed in 2016 Haiti Missions | Minnesota

    Dr.Shu went to Haiti for his 2016 Haiti mission in the end of October. This is the second time that Dr. Shu participated in the Haiti mission through No Scalpel Vasectomy Inc. (NSVI), and it is also the fourth time that he participated in the international mission in the past two years.

    For the first time, in October 2016, two NSVI teams provided vasectomy procedures and training at two sites simultaneously in northern Haiti. Over four days, this enabled the team to provide vasectomies at five sites, visiting some sites on more than one day. Each team was composed of three international vasectomy experts and either an experienced Haitian vasectomist or a Haitian trainee. About 122 vasectomies were performed during the October mission alone. In total, 289 vasectomies were performed during the three Haiti missions of 2016.

    Our “Guest Vasectomist” volunteers not only paid their own ways to Haiti, but also made generous donations to help cover NSVI expenses.
    2016-haititeam-1

    From distant locations in North America, our vasectomists met the Floridians in Miami.
    2016-team-met-miami-airport-2

  • nsvi-team-and-haiti-physicians-5

    NSVI team and Haiti physicians

  • Risks & Complications of Vasectomy Reversal (Vasovasostomy) | Minnesota

    risk Although an Easy™ vasectomy reversal is one of the safest procedures, there are still chances of minor complications, such as infection, bleeding, prolonged pain or transient bruising, temporary swelling or fluid accumulation. Most patients experience a dull ache in the scrotal region, but this usually resolves with time. We avoid the risks related to general anesthesia or intravenous sedation by using the local anesthesia only, and the risk from local anesthesia is almost zero.

    The potential risks and complications:

    • Hematoma(collection of blood) in the scrotum occurs in less than 5% of men. Mild swelling, bruise and pain are expected after such surgery, but excessive scrotal swelling and bruise could be a hematoma, the patients should report immediately if they suspect to have a hematoma. Small hematoma usually resolves by itself, and the patients may take the pain medications and antibiotic for pain management and infection prevention. Large hematoma needs to be drained to facilitate recovery. Very occasionally, the patient needs to be operated in order to stop acute arterial bleeding. We didn’t have any case of large hematoma or arterial bleeding since we offered the vasectomy reversal service.
    • Seroma (collection of fluid) can accumulate in the scrotum after surgical trauma and local anesthesia. It happens rarely. In some cases that prone to develop hematoma or seroma, Dr. Shu preventively put small Penrose rubber tube in the scrotum to drain the blood or fluid over 24 hours.
    • Infection occurs in the wound or inside scrotum, more common if there is a hematoma beneath the skin. The risk of infection in vasectomy reversal procedure is less than 1%. The patients usually take oral antibiotic in the first week of post-op to minimize it. If scrotal infection happens, abscess needs to be drained, and the patients will be given a different oral antibiotic, or in its most serious form, intravenous antibiotics in the clinic or hospital.
    • The patients should watch for the signs of infections in the first week, such as worsening pain, swelling, redness, or purulent drainage, and fever. We didn’t have any case of scrotum infection since we offered the vasectomy reversal service in our clinic.
    • Postoperative acute pain (mild) in the first week or occasional prolonged dull ache (congestion) in the testicles, usually disappears within a few weeks or months.
    • During or after vasectomy reversal, when a small amount of sperms and fluid leaks out of the reconnected site of vas, it may induce an inflammatory reaction termed a granuloma (risk less than 1%) that may be painful, but usually resolves with time. Rarely this will disrupt the reconnection.
    • Epididymitis, when the packed vas tube behind the testicle becomes inflamed and swollen, although very rare, can be treated with heat application and medication.
    • Sexual difficulties for the man due to psychological and emotional responses to a vasectomy reversal.

    More Feedback From Our Vasectomy Patients in 2016 | Minnesota

    More Feedback From Our Vasectomy Patients in 2016:

  • I was very nervous about having the procedure done but Dr. Schu was very professional and put me at ease. There was literally no pain whatsoever and the recovery time was very quick. I would highly recommend his services. Also the office was very warm and inviting and the staff were very friendly.
  • Easy start to finish
  • It was a piece of cake. I was so anxious up to and most of the way through the procedure, but it was done quickly and as easy as I hoped.
  • Amazing should have did it years ago.
  • It was a breeze! 7 minutes and I was in and out. Very little pain, and after taking it easy for a couple days I was right back into my regular schedule. Highly recommended!
  • Already have recommended to friends
  • Should of done this sooner! Very fast, easy and painless.
  • The procedure was fast, convenient and the pain was minimal (less than I expected). Happy with the decision to chose this procedure and this Dr.
  • Had a little more pain post-vasectomy than anticipated. And occasional pain a couple times in the few weeks after the procedure. Otherwise it went well.
  • I would recommend all my friends to Dr. Shu
  • 2 Free Large Pizza on World Vasectomy Day on November 18th | Minnesota

    For the fourth year in a row, Dr.Shu will be participating in World Vasectomy Day, an event that brings focus to the role men can take in family planning as responsible citizens of our planet. The vasectomies we are offering on World Vasectomy Day are part of a global effort. If you have the vasectomies done on November 18th, you will receive 2 free large pizza ($20 gift card).

    pizza

    Doctors in health clinics and medical offices around the globe will perform as many vasectomies as possible in one 24-hour period for World Vasectomy Day, Nov. 18th, 2016. The fourth annual event is designed to heighten awareness of and dispel myths about vasectomy, increase access to the procedure, and to inspire more men to become engaged in the global family planning conversation, above all.

    On November 18, 2016 World Vasectomy Day will be headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya! with free vasectomies offered by the local providers in Nairobi and international trainers. They will be joined by 1000 vasectomists worldwide. The event will be live-streamed including interviews with family planning experts, patients and their family members.

    Although most family planning specialists consider vasectomy the most effective permanent form of birth control available to men, there is still much resistance. Despite costing on average one-fifth as much as tubal ligation, not requiring general anesthesia or hospitalization, vasectomy is performed at less than half the rate of tubal ligation in the U.S. Worldwide, less than three percent of married women ages 15 to 49 rely on their partner’s vasectomy for contraception.

    More information about World Vasectomy Day can be found at http://worldvasectomyday.org.

    World Vasectomy Day, November 18, 2016 | Minnesota

    On November 18, 2016 World Vasectomy Day will be headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya! with free vasectomies offered by the local providers in Nairobi and international trainers. They will be joined by 1000 vasectomists worldwide. The event will be live-streamed including interviews with family planning experts, patients and their family members.

    For the 4th year in a row, Dr.Shu will be participating in World Vasectomy Day, an event that brings focus to the role men can take in family planning as responsible citizens of our planet. The vasectomies we are offering on World Vasectomy Day are part of a global effort.

    WVD Doctors in health clinics and medical offices around the globe will perform as many vasectomies as possible in one 24-hour period for World Vasectomy Day, Nov. 18, 2016. The fourth annual event is designed to heighten awareness of and dispel myths about vasectomy, increase access to the procedure, and to inspire more men to become engaged in the global family planning conversation.

    More information about World Vasectomy Day can be found at World Vasectomy Day.

    Feedback from Our Vasectomy Patients (1) | Minnesota

    Here are the feedback from our vasectomy patients.

    • I found I was worried over nothing. It was minimal discomfort and even that was completely gone after a week.

    • The procedure was very quick (20 minutes from the moment that I was called in until the moment that I walked out). There was virtually no pain at all, and within 4 days I was completely back to normal. I would highly recommend this procedure and Dr. Shu to anyone looking to have a vasectomy.

    • super easy procedure

    • I am very pleased with the procedure! It was as easy as 1,2,3 .

    • Everything was real good except having to wait 30 min. past the scheduled appointment before getting in for procedure.

    • Very easy procedure. Thanks to the staff for calming my nerves.

    • It’s hard to rate the procedure. I didn’t enjoy it.

    • I have recommended the office to several friends.

    • I would highly recommend this type of vasectomy. A quick procedure,with very little pain and a fast recovery.

    • Any fears about pain, mishaps, or the procedure were unnecessary. The entire experience was far more easier than I had anticipated. I highly recommended your clinic for anyone considering a vesectomy. Thank you.

    • This was as easy and painless as it could possibly be. I also saved a TON of money over going to my regular doctor’s office. I am very happy with my decision.

    • I should have had this done 30 years ago

    • I could not believe how painless it was. I was worried about it for no reason. It was over in less than five minutes once from the time I was set on the table to the time i was

    Three Major Reasons a Vasectomy Beats a Tubal Ligation | Minnesota

    Every couple in Minnesota whose family is complete may consider permanent birth control. The sterilization procedures include vasectomy, tubal ligation, or tubal blocking. Both men and women should know and compare the differences, benefits and risks of these procedures. For most couples, vasectomy is often the safer, simpler and more affordable. There are ample medical and personal reasons why a couple might prefer vasectomy to tubal ligation or blocking. This blog may help you make a more informed decision.

    1.Hospital based Versus Office based
    Tubal ligation in Minnesota is usually laparoscopic procedure that involves hospitalization, general anesthesia and lengthier, more complicated surgery than a vasectomy. In comparison, vasectomy may be completed in 10 minutes with minimal trauma. Tubal ligation requires much longer recovery time than vasectomy. Moreover, Women are more likely to have the immediate and long term complications related to a tubal ligation than men who have a vasectomy.

    Vasectomies are usually outpatient procedures performed in the doctors’ office and usually take 10 minutes to complete. No scalpel vasectomy has a very quick recovery and very low risk of complications.

    2.Pain
    Women who have had tubal ligation may experience abdominal pain/cramping, dizziness, fatigue, gas, bleeding from the incision, and discharge. Of course, not every woman will experience these symptoms, and severity of symptoms can vary from woman to woman.

    Believe or not, the Easy™ no scalpel vasectomy procedure is incredibly simple and almost pain free. How do we achieve it?

      No scalpel: The new surgical techniques of the no scalpel vasectomy greatly minimize trauma and pain by only making a small, single punch in the skin of scrotum with special instruments, as opposed to a conventional, more invasive open procedure.
      No Needle: Madajet is a spray applicator that delivers a fine stream of anesthetic at a pressure great enough to penetrate the skin and envelop the vas deferens tube beneath the skin with an almost 100% efficacy rate, eliminating the need for additional anesthetic.
      No suture: the wound is so tiny ( a few millimeter) that it doesn’t require a suture to close it.

    3.Cost
    When it comes to cost, a simple office vasectomy is more than four to five times less expensive than a routine tubal ligation.

    An advantage of tubal ligation is that it works immediately, but a vasectomy doesn’t give you instant result, it requires 15-20 ejaculations in the period of 2-3 months. So you have to use a backup method of contraception until you’re in the clear in semen analysis.

    The Essure and Adiana devices, which are inserted into the Fallopian tubes, are new alternatives to traditional tubal ligation in Minnesota; it requires a confirmation in 3 months with an x-ray test called a hysterosalpingogram to ensure that they’re installed properly. Another form of birth control must be used in the first 3 months. These tubal blocking procedures are less invasive than tubal ligation, but failure rates are higher in tubal blocking procedures than tubal ligation and no scalpel vasectomy.

    People in the Minneapolis and St Paul areas should review all information on sterilization procedures from the reliable websites and your physicians, however, when it comes to risks, benefits, cost, and effectiveness, no scalpel vasectomy is more often the best option of sterilization.

    An Affordable and One Trip Vasectomy Care System in Minnesota

    In the previous blog, we talked about the fear of pain, one of three most common road blockers for Minnesotan men hesitating to have a vasectomy. This blog talks about affordability and convenience in vasectomy care in Minnesota.

    Not too long ago, there was no Internet, or very limited information on Internet. All medical information came from the words of doctors only. Therefore, the patients had to come to the doctor’s office for detailed counseling on sterilization. In the 21st century, medical information on the Internet has been exploding, including vasectomy information. The patients are able to study everything about vasectomy procedures as much as they want and take their time to make a wise decision on their family planning. As we all know, men are a different creature, and they hate coming to the doctor’s office three times for finishing the whole process of vasectomy care.

    We understand men’s psychology. That is why One Stop Medical Center developed a powerful website, EZvasectomy.com, with rich information on vasectomy and vasectomy reversal. All patients are required to review the important vasectomy information and watch a consultation video. A separate initial consultation is no longer required, although it is an option in certain special situations or per patient’s request. Dr. Shu will finalize the consultation on the same day of the surgery, so the patients don’t need another trip for the initial consultation. Moreover, the patients are able to register their vasectomy procedures by filling out the online registration form in the website.

    Traditionally, the vasectomized patients need to bring specimen for semen analysis three months following the surgery. One Stop Medical Center developed a mailer system to eliminate another trip for patients. Patients who live far away may simply mail the specimen to the clinic instead of bringing it personally. Therefore, most patients are able to have a vasectomy done in just one trip to our clinic instead of three.

    Our clinic used to charge much more for vasectomy procedure. In order to reduce the financial burden for our vasectomy patients, we cut the price of no scalpel vasectomy almost in half. This way, more men can afford to have their vasectomy done.

    One Stop Medical Center has simplified the vasectomy care system to create a more affordable, friendly and convenient vasectomy care system.

    Common Questions Men Ask About A Vasectomy: Pain | Minnesota

    The idea of Easy™ no scalpel vasectomy can seem daunting – on the one hand, it is a minimal invasive procedure done in a doctor’s office in 10 minutes, using only local anesthesia, and it is one of the most reliable, cost-effective forms of long term birth control available. On the other hand, a vasectomy can feel like kind of a drastic step to take because vasectomy is a surgical procedure. Although the techniques used in Easy™ no scalpel vasectomy is so advanced and so minimal invasive, still, many men in Minnesota hesitate to have their vasectomy done due to three factors: fear of pain, cost, and time. We are talking about each of them in this series of blogs. The first blog is to talk about pain related to vasectomy.

    Is there pain during the Easy™ vasectomy procedure?
    The number one objection voiced by the male in Minnesota to having a vasectomy done is the fear of pain. Believe or not, the Easy™ no scalpel vasectomy procedure is incredibly simple, safe and almost pain free. How do we achieve it?

    1. No scalpel: The new surgical techniques of the no scalpel vasectomy greatly minimize trauma and pain by only making a small, single punch in the skin of scrotum with special instruments, as opposed to a conventional, more invasive open procedure.

    2. No Needle: Madajet is a spray applicator that delivers a fine stream of anesthetic at a pressure great enough to penetrate the skin and envelop the vas deferens tube beneath the skin with an almost 100% efficacy rate, eliminating the need for additional anesthetic.

    95% of Minnesotan patients say there was mild, minimal, or no pain with their brief vasectomy procedure. Each patient is unique, and some are more sensitive to pain and discomfort than others. For some men, thinking about it may be more discomforting anxiety than the actual procedure. By offering no needle and no scalpel techniques for a vasectomy, One Stop Medical Center in the Twin Cities has mitigated the pain of the procedure and the fear that comes with it.

    How long will I experience discomfort after Easy™ vasectomy?
    The single wound in the middle of scrotum after Easy™ vasectomy is so tiny that it doesn’t even require a suture to close it, which further facilitates the recovery and healing. Discomfort afterwards is minimal. A shorter recovery time with mild swelling and bruise means that patients will be back to their normal routine just in two days after the procedure.

    Small percentage men state they still felt a certain degree of ache or discomfort for a few weeks after the procedure, but if you’re still sore or tender after more than a couple weeks you may want to give your physician a call.

    Procedure Clinic Offers No-scalpel, No-needle, No-suture Vasectomy | Minnesota

    Getting a vasectomy is an important decision in any man’s life and it is not a decision that should be taken lightly. Vasectomy is a safe and popular procedure of male contraception that is highly effective and a no scalpel vasectomy can be done in as little as ten minutes. Dr. Shu at Procedure Clinic uses state of the art technology and minimal invasive techniques and his years of experience for performing vasectomies and he has performed hundreds of such procedures in recent years. No scalpel vasectomy is a simple procedure that has a very low failure rate and quick recovery period as patients can resume work in as little as two days.

    Things to Know About Vasectomy

    One should gather ample information and learn the facts and concepts associated with vasectomy before undergoing the procedure. Here are some things you should know about vasectomy before choosing it as a form of contraception:

  • Vasectomy is performed as a permanent form of male contraception
  • No scalpel vasectomy is much less invasive and offers quick recovery
  • Vasectomy is ideal for men who are 100% sure they do not want more children
  • Vasectomies are nearly 100 percent effective and safe.
  • They don’t reduce a man’s sexual drive, virility, or ability to have or enjoy sex.
  • For more information on no scalpel vasectomy, please browse through https://ezvasectomy.com.

    Dr. Shu participating in 2016 Philippine Vasectomy Mission | Minneapolis & St Paul

    A group of doctors from the United States, Canada, Australia, Poland, will be going to the Philippines from February 21 to March 2nd, 2016 to provide free vasectomies for local residents. Minnesota physician Dr. Steven Shu, medical director of One Stop Medical Center, is participating in this mission. This is the third time that he has been part of an international vasectomy mission sponsored by the nonprofit organization, No Scalpel Vasectomy International Inc (NSVI). It is expected that more than 400 no scalpel vasectomies (NSV) will be done in the 8-day trip.

    The NSV mission is sponsored by No Scalpel Vasectomy International Inc.(NSVI), which has been providing free NSV services since 2001. The mission of NSVI is to promote and provide free No-Scalpel Vasectomy services worldwide, but especially in developing countries whose infrastructure and environmental resources are challenged by rapid population growth unchecked by established and/or effective family planning programs.

    Dr. Shu shares a passion with the vasectomy guru Dr. Doug Stein in Tampa, FL, promoting and providing no scalpel vasectomy (NSV) services worldwide. As an expert in office procedures in Minnesota, Dr. Shu has been enjoying making my contributions to local communities over the past 13 years. Since 2015, he has been focusing more on his international volunteer work in Philippines and Haiti..

    Please feel free to steer a few of your philanthropic dollars toward NSVI. You probably already give to other organizations with top-heavy administrations who are strangers to you. What better gesture than to donate $45 to help a poor Haitian man (1) reduce his overhead, (2) reduce the risk to his partner of another unintended pregnancy, (3) more successfully nurture fewer children, and (4) reduce overcrowding in a small country whose environment has already been stripped of many resources by a population of over 10,000,000.

    World Vasectomy Animation

    Video World Vasectomy Animation

    We all have occasions we celebrate each year. For us, that date is World Vasectomy Day!

    But what is World Vasectomy Day? Let’s take it one step at a time.

    A vasectomy is a permanent form of birth control for men where the doctor first separates the vas deferens and then seals up each end. This prevents sperm from entering into the seminal stream and fertilizing a woman’s egg. After it’s done you’ll still produce the same amount of semen, but no sperm, or like some say, ‘all juice no seeds’.

    Can you just use a condom? For sure, but it turns out 18 out of every 100 men who use a condom as their primary form of birth control get a woman pregnant within a year.

    With a vasectomy, failure is less than 1%. You do the math. And what do you call a man who uses withdrawal? Daddy.

    And while no guy likes a doctor poking around in our private parts, for almost 99% of men there’s no lasting pain, the whole thing takes only 15 minutes and there’s no negative effect on our sex lives.

    In fact, eliminating the fear of pregnancy can actually make it better.

    You’d think every man, whose family is complete would get a vasectomy, but there are whole countries where less than 1% even choose the option.

    So why are men so resistant?

    Bad information and old habits lead to fears like my sex life will decrease” or “My testosterone will decline.

    The Luo language of Kenya uses the same word for “vasectomy” and “castration’, but the common fear world over is that a vasectomy makes you less of a man.

    Really?

    Manhood is not determined by how many children you make, but how well you care for those you already have.
    And some people don’t even want any kids and that’s their choice as well.

    A courageous man doesn’t run from risk, he shares responsibility with his partner. He doesn’t give in to fear. He gets a vasectomy out of love.

    And if that love includes concern for the planet our children will inherit, you should know that a vasectomy lowers carbon footprint 28 times more than a lifetime of reducing, reusing and recycling.

    So on World Vasectomy Day we celebrate the men and women who rise as one to take responsibility for our children, our families and our future. For some this means choosing to get a vasectomy, for the doctors and providers it means doing them.

    For all of us how we create new life is certainly the most important conversation of our lives. So join us this year on November 13, as we make history and create a better future.

    Achieving Zero Failure Rate and Zero Infection Rate in No Scalpel Vasectomy | Minnesota

    All birth controlmethods work best if used correctly every time you have sex. The vasectomy has one of the lowest failure rates among birth control methods. Moreover, no-scalpel vasectomy has many proven advantages with a lower complication rate over the conventional vasectomy. Still, some men in Minnesota hesitate to have their vasectomy done because they are afraid of failure and complications.

    One Stop Medical Center of Twin Cities reported a zero failure rate and zero infection rate in about 600 vasectomy cases, most of which were performed in the past few years. All vasectomies were performed with no scalpel, no needle, and no suture techniques.

    The failure rate for the no scalpel vasectomy, which uses the fascia clipping technique, is even lower than the traditional vasectomy. The immediate risks of vasectomy are bleeding and infection, but these risks are generally very low for vasectomies. The risks are even lower with our no scalpel vasectomy.”

    A very small percentage of patients develop small hematomas (collection of blood) and large hematomas are even rarer. Small hematomas usually resolve by themselves. Large hematomas need an incision and drainage.

    One Stop Medical Center has developed a powerful website with a plethora of information on the vasectomy that helps Minnesota patients to understand the potential side effects and complications. It also provides detailed instructions on how to prevent common complications.

    World Vasectomy Day, November 13, 2015 | Minnesota

    On November 13, 2015 World Vasectomy Day will be headquartered in Bali with free vasectomies offered by the local providers in Bali and international trainers. They will be joined by over 500 vasectomists worldwide. The event will be live-streamed including interviews with family planning experts, patients and their family members.

    For the third year in a row, Dr.Shu will be participating in World Vasectomy Day, an event that brings focus to the role men can take in family planning as responsible citizens of our planet. The vasectomies we are offering on World Vasectomy Day are part of a global effort.

    WVDDoctors in health clinics and medical offices around the globe will perform as many vasectomies as possible in one 24-hour period for World Vasectomy Day, Nov. 13, 2015. The third annual event is designed to heighten awareness of and dispel myths about vasectomy, increase access to the procedure, and to inspire more men to become engaged in the global family planning conversation.

    More information about World Vasectomy Day can be found at http://worldvasectomyday.org.

    One Stop Medical Center Provides Vasectomy & Reversal Online Registration

    When patients seek the vasectomy or vasectomy reversal procedures, they often face frustration related to lengthy check-in processes involving necessary but substantial paperwork. To ease this burden, One Stop Medical Center recently unveiled an online registration forms in its website, EZvasectomy.com that allows patients to conveniently prepare for their visits and office procedures in advance, using either their computers or their mobile devices.

    There are many advantages to use the secure online registration. By using the online registration, the patients are required to review all information before they sign off. Therefore, the patients are completely informed after online registration. It will save time on the day of consultation and/or procedures. By registering in the privacy of patients ‘own homes or offices, the patients will not be distracted by other activity within doctor’s office on the day of visit. The patients are able to give more accurate information because they may also have access to medical information (prior surgeries, medications, names of doctors) that they may not recall on the day of visit. Moreover, Doctors are able to review patients’ history and to call them if there are any medical or social concerns before their office visits.

    When a patient registers online for a vasectomy or a reversal procedure, we can expedite their visit to make it much more convenient and easy. In fact, once they arrive, it’s basically just a matter of verifying who they are in order to see the provider, since we already have most of the information needed in our system.

    Vasectomy Online Registration

    Reversal Online Registration

    Minnesota Physician Dr. Shu to participate in Vasectomy Mission in the Philippines in Feb 2015

    A group of doctors from the United States, Canada, Australia, Poland, and Ireland will be going to the Philippines from February 3nd to 10th to provide free vasectomies for local residents. Minnesota physician Dr. Steven Shu, medical director of One Stop Medical Center, is participating in this mission. It is expected that more than 500 no scalpel vasectomies (NSV) will be done in the 8-day trip.

    The NSV mission is sponsored by No Scalpel Vasectomy International Inc.(NSVI), which has been providing free NSV services since 2001. The mission of NSVI is to promote and provide free No-Scalpel Vasectomy services worldwide, but especially in developing countries whose infrastructure and environmental resources are challenged by rapid population growth unchecked by established and/or effective family planning programs.

    As an expert in office procedures in Minnesota, Dr. Shu has been enjoying making my contributions to local communities over the past 13 years. From now on, he will focus more on his international volunteer work.

    For more information, please read the news release “Minnesota Physician to Participate in Vasectomy Mission in the Philippines“.

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